Case Surveillance Update | 2021.2.8

Trends in short

  • As of February 7, 32,340,146 people have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. Over 59 million doses of vaccines have been delivered to states, territories, and federal agencies that are charged with distribution.[1]
  • The rate of new COVID-19 cases in the US has fallen 31% in the past two weeks, but daily case rates are still well above the case peaks during last spring and summer. Daily cases peaked around 31,000 in April and 70,000 in July. In the past week, the average number of new cases per day has been 118,016.[2]
  • New coronavirus cases in Connecticut have declined in the past two weeks. The state is currently seeing an average of 1,336 new cases per day, down from 2,056 cases per day two weeks ago.[3]
  • The number of daily COVID-19 cases is decreasing in Rhode Island, with an average of 493 new cases per day this week compared to 756 cases per two weeks ago.[4]

International case numbers

  • 106,377,695 COVID-19 diagnosed cases worldwide; 2,321,971 deaths; 59,311,562 recovered.[5] More than 131 million doses of vaccines have been administered in 73 countries.[6]
  • The United States continues to have the highest number of reported COVID-19 cases at 27,045,671. India has the second highest number of reported cases with 10,838,194, Brazil third with 9,524,640 cases, and the United Kingdom fourth with 3,971,287 cases.[7]
  • South Africa has halted COVID-19 vaccination after initial findings that suggest the Astra-Zeneca one-shot vaccine is not very effective against the B.1.351 variant which was first detected in the country.[8]
  • Comparatively fewer cases in India and Brazil are likely related to testing. In India, a faster but less reliable method of testing for COVID-19 has gained popularity and fewer tests are being conducted overall in comparison to other countries.[9] Similarly, case numbers are expected to actually be much higher than reported in Brazil but testing lags far behind the rate of testing in other countries.[10]
  • The new B.1.1.7 variant of COVID-19 first discovered in the United Kingdom has now been detected in various countries throughout the world, including the US.[11] Early studies suggest that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is effective against the variant.[12]
  • Other COVID-19 variants have been identified in South Africa, Nigeria, and Brazil. None of the variants appear to cause more severe illness although they do spread more easily and may cause reinfection among people who have already contracted COVID-19.[13]

Distribution of new coronavirus cases and deaths worldwide each week (from The World Health Organization COVID-19 Weekly Situation Update, as of 1/31/2021).[14]

US National case numbers

  • 27,045,671 cases of coronavirus confirmed by lab tests, 464,215 deaths, and more than 9,400,000 recovered cases. 320,378,941 total tests have been conducted.[15]
  • 32,340,146 people have received at least one dose and 9,518,015 people have received two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine.[16]
  • The states with the highest rate of cases per 100,000 people in the country are currently South Carolina, Texas, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Oklahoma. Texas, which has 58 cases per 100,000 people in the state, is currently seeing an average of 16,931 new COVID-19 cases per day.[17]
  • December saw the highest number of COVID-19-related deaths in the United States, surpassing those in April. 57,638 people in America died, an average of 2,506 deaths per day compared to an average of 1,842 deaths per day in April at the beginning of the pandemic.[18]
  • The US COVID-19 testing system is now processing about 2 million tests daily, enough to test those who have symptoms of COVID-19, a smaller number of those who believe they may have come into contact with someone who is carrying coronavirus, and essential workers.[19] It is still not enough to detect a significant number of asymptomatic carriers who are still thought to be the greatest contributors to the spread of COVID-19. The inability to effectively test a large proportion of asymptomatic people is complicating the country’s ability to slow the spread of the coronavirus. 

Risk in population

COVID-19 deaths reported to National Center for Health Statistics as of February 3, 2021[20]

Age group Total number of deathsPercentage of reported deaths
0-247350.17%
25-449,7242.31%
45-5419,4544.62%
55-6449,13111.66%
65-7489,89621.33%
75+252,42859.91%

Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19 by Demographic Characteristics as of February 3, 2021[21]

Population Total
Female45.69%
Male54.31%
White40.70%
Black13.70%
American Indian or Alaskan Native0.40%
Asian9.80%
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander0.20%
Hispanic33.20%
Other2.10%

Known cases in Connecticut (call 211 or text “CTCOVID” to 898211 for information)

  • As of February 4, 2021 there were 259,372 confirmed and probable cases (+21,557 from January 22), 827 hospitalizations (-231 from January 22), and 7,214 deaths (+395 from January 22). 5,943,683 patients have been tested in the state with a 3.04% daily positivity rate.[22]
  • Confirmed and probable cumulative cases by county[23]
    • Fairfield County:  74,404 cases, 1,947 deaths
    • Hartford County: 65,496 cases, 2,178 deaths
    • Litchfield County: 10,256 cases, 259 deaths
    • Middlesex County: 9,549 cases, 325 deaths
    • New Haven County: 65,488 cases, 1,820 deaths
    • New London County: 17,587 cases, 376 deaths
    • Tolland County: 7,163 cases, 146 deaths 
    • Windham County: 8,571 cases, 155 deaths

Cumulative Cases and Deaths in CT with Percent Increase from Previous Reporting Period by County

CountyFeb. 4Jan. 22Jan. 4Dec. 17Dec. 8Nov. 23
Fairfield Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
74,404
(7.7)
1,947
(3.2)
69,065
(17.1)
1,886
(7.5)
58,959
(16.5)
1,755
(7.8)
50,614
(12.5)
1,628
(3.2)
44,980 
(27.5)
1,577 
(6.8)
35,272
(27.6)
1,477
(1.9)
Hartford Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
65,496
(9.1)
2,178
(6.3)
60,027
(21.1)
2,048
(7.8)
49,560
(22.0)
1,900 
(9.6)
40,611
(17.7)
1,733 
(4.1)
34,516
(30.6)
1,664
(6.0)
26,424
(29.5)
1,570
(3.4)
Litchfield Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
10,256
(9.2)
259
(5.3)
9,391
(19.1)
246
(6.0)
7,885 
(22.0)
232
(13.2)
6,515 
(17.7)
205 
(12.6)
5,569
(44.5)
182
(13.8)
3,853
(42.5)
160
(8.1)
Middlesex Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
9,549
(9.6)
325
(5.9)
8,712
(23.6)
307
(19.0)
7,047 
(31.3)
258
(13.2)
5,367
(18.4)
228
(6.0)
4,534
(35.0)
215
(7.5)
3,358
(43.8)
200
(1.0)
New Haven Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
65,488
(9.0)
1,820
(4.7)
60,085
(19.5)
1,738
(9.7)
50,290
(20.5)
1,584
(11.2)
41,723
(16.8)
1,425
(6.7)
35,720
(34.6)
1,336
(11.1)
26,531
(32.3)
1,202
(5.1)
New London Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
17,587
(12.1)
376 
(9.6)
15,684
(35.0)
343
(29.9)
11,616
(29.9)
264
(25.1)
8,940
(21.9)
211
(11.6)
7,335
(31.2)
189
(16.0)
5,592
(29.3)
163
(8.7)
Tolland Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
7,163
(11.5)
146 
(15.9)
6,422
(22.9)
126
(11.5)
5,225 
(24.5)
113 
(13.0)
4,197 
(17.0)
100 
(16.3)
3,588
(27.1)
86
(19.4)
2,824
(41.8)
72
(5.9)
Windham Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
8,571
(12.2)
155
(29.2)
7,642
(34.6)
120
(39.5)
5,676
(36.7)
86
(68.6)
4,153 
(26.2)
51
(41.7)
3,290
(42.2)
36
(33.3)
2,313
(37.3)
27
(28.6)

Connecticut Cumulative Statistics by Month for Age and Race/Ethnicity

COVID Cases (Deaths) by AgeFeb. 4Jan. 22Jan. 4Dec. 17
0 – 9 cases (deaths)13,690 (2)12,049 (1)9,264 (1)7,292 (1)
10 – 19 cases (deaths)27,065 (3)24,331 (1)19,142 (1)15,582 (1)
20 – 29 cases (deaths)44,256 (7)40,725 (6)33,520 (6)27,872 (6)
30 – 39 cases (deaths)39,838 (33)36,634 (32)30,471 (29)25,172 (26)
40 – 49 cases (deaths)36,326 (103)33,398 (95)27,560 (87)22,857 (79)
50 – 59 cases (deaths)40,147 (349)36,783 (323)30,580 (280)24,986 (239)
60 – 69 cases (deaths)27,714 (903)25,529 (858)21,494 (781)17,664 (703)
70 – 79 cases (deaths)15,120 (1,612)14,022 (1,523)12,058 (1,364)10,089 (1,218)
80+ cases (deaths)15,145 (4,202)14,293 (3,980)12,824 (3,642)11,231 (3,308)
COVID Cases (Deaths) by Race/Ethnicity
Hispanic cases (deaths)38,252 (711)36,003 (664)32,285 (600)27,869 (526)
American Indian or Alaskan Native cases (deaths)382 (3)353 (3)313 (3)269 (3)
Asian or Pacific Islander cases (deaths)2,632 (81)2,408 (78)2,085 (71)1,780 (64)
Black cases (deaths)17,851 (872)16,504 (851)14,472 (802)12,984 (756)
Multiracial cases (deaths) 14,349 (263)12,035 (188)7,736 (94)4,317 (56)
Other cases (deaths)13,630 (34)12,046 (32)9,047 (34)6,234 (25)
White cases (deaths) 75,634 (5,135)69,352 (4,894)59,527 (4,493)49,960 (4,084)
Unknown cases (deaths)96,642 (115)89,114 (109)71,503 (95)59,369 (67)
  • As of February 3rd, the Yale New Haven Health System currently has 313 hospitalized patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis, down from 361 last week. For context, at the height of the April peak in cases 750 patients were hospitalized.
  • Yale New Haven Health Hospital currently has 173 patients, 58 of whom are in the ICU and 25 of whom are on ventilators. Greenwich Hospital currently has 22 patients, Westerly Hospital has 15, Bridgeport Hospital has 76, and Lawrence and Memorial Hospital has 27.  

Connecticut developments

  • Connecticut has the fifth-highest rate of administering the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, as 11.4% of the population has received their first dose.[24]
  • Connecticut is now allowing individuals aged 65-74 to book COVID-19 vaccination appointments although the state has not formally announced the expansion.[25]
  • There has been a 70% drop COVID-19 related nursing home deaths in the past month, likely associated with vaccination in those facilities.[26]
  • Connecticut is partially in phase 1B of vaccine distribution, under which individuals age 75 and older, residents and staff of some congregate settings (including homeless shelters, mental health facilities, and domestic violence shelters) as well as all persons serving in healthcare settings with the potential for exposure to COVID-19, long-term care facility residents, and first responders can receive vaccination.[27]
  • To accommodate newly eligible residents, Connecticut has opened more COVID-19 vaccination sites throughout the state. In Connecticut more than 250,000 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine have been administered, the fourth-highest number for all states in the nation.[28]
  • Connecticut is using a contact tracing phone application. Phones that are running the app link data on which phones have come into close proximity to data on COVID-19 diagnoses to send an alert to those phones that their users have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. Currently, only about 20% of cellphones in Connecticut are using the app but wider use could lead to more automated contact tracing efforts.[29]

Known cases in Rhode Island (call 401-222-8022 for information)

  • As of February 8, 2021[30]
    • 119,104 confirmed cumulative cases (+9,369 from 1/22/21; a 8.54% increase in the two-week period)
    • 2,667,850 total tests conducted (+304,719 from 1/22/21)
    • 86,750 people have received the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine (+33,825 from  1/22/21)
    • 35,997 people have received two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine (+22,852 from 1/22/21)
    • 241 patients currently hospitalized (-111 from 1/22/21)
    • 42 patients currently in ICU (-1 from 1/22/21)
    • 2,236 deaths in the state (+153 from 1/22/21)

Rhode Island developments

  • Rhode Island is continuing to ease some of its COVID-19 restrictions. Now, 30 people can gather indoors and 50 can gather outdoors for events, indoor dining is allowed at 50% capacity and 2 households can dine together, and up to 33% of office workers can return to in-person work, but remote work is still preferred if possible.[31]
  • The Rhode Island Department of Corrections has administered about 3,000 doses of a COVID-19 vaccines in Adult Correctional Institutions. 248 inmates have received two doses of a vaccine. Additionally, 919 staff members that work in correctional facilities have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. People who are incarcerated are three times more likely to die of COVID-19, and vaccination efforts are a part of the state’s plan to stop the spread of the coronavirus from the community into the state’s sole correctional facility.[32]
  • Dr. Anthony Farina, who runs at least six medical practices in Rhode Island, had his medical license suspended for knowingly exposing patients to the coronavirus. Dr. Farina became symptomatic and tested positive for COVID-19 in late November, but continued to see patients and wore a face mask with his nose exposed.[33]

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