Case Surveillance Update | 2021.3.8

Trends in short

  • As of March 8, 60,005,231 people have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. Over 116 million doses of vaccines have been delivered to states, territories, and federal agencies that are charged with distribution.[1]
  • The rate of new COVID-19 cases in the US has fallen 12% in the past two weeks. The weekly average of new cases has finally fallen below the average of new cases during the summer surge of cases, but is still above the initial spring peak in cases. In the past week, the average number of new cases per day has been 58,745.[2]
  • New coronavirus cases in Connecticut have declined in the past two weeks. The state is currently seeing an average of 769 new cases per day, down from 823 cases per day two weeks ago.[3]
  • The number of daily COVID-19 cases is increasing in Rhode Island, with an average of 357 new cases per day this week, up from 332 cases per two weeks ago.[4]

International case numbers

  • 117,055,507 COVID-19 diagnosed cases worldwide; 2,597,213 deaths; 66,283,143 recovered.[5] More than 306 million doses of vaccines have been administered in 115 countries.[6]
  • The United States continues to have the highest number of reported COVID-19 cases at 29,030,476. India has the second highest number of reported cases with 11,229,398, Brazil third with 11,019,344 cases, and Russia fourth with 4,284,408 cases.[7]
  • 14 African countries–including South Africa which initially halted COVID-19 vaccination after initial findings that suggested the Astra-Zeneca one-shot vaccine was not very effective against the B.1.351 variant[8]— have begun vaccination programs, largely thanks to the Covax program aimed at ensuring equitable vaccine distribution worldwide.[9]
  • Although the number of reported COVID-19 cases in densely populated countries in Asia and Africa may in part be connected to reduced testing capacity, it appears as though many countries are not facing as great of a COVID-associated death toll as many wealthier nations. Multiple factors appear to be influencing lower mortality rates across Asia and Africa, including the fact that many of the countries have younger populations,[10] warmer climates allow people to spend more time outdoors where coronavirus is less transmissible,[11] previous exposure to other coronaviruses and microbes may increase natural immunity,[12] and because many countries have enacted swift, effective policies to curtail COVID-19.[13]
  • Multiple variants of the COVID-19 virus have been discovered throughout the world. While research is ongoing, it appears that variants generally may spread between people more easily but are not necessarily more deadly on a per incident basis. Research so far suggests that COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized for use in the United States are effective against the variants.[14]

Distribution of new coronavirus cases and deaths worldwide each week (from The World Health Organization COVID-19 Weekly Situation Update, as of 2/28/2021).[15]

US National case numbers

  • 29,030,476 cases of coronavirus confirmed by lab tests, 525,619 deaths, and more than 12,000,000 recovered cases. 359,724,291 total tests have been conducted.[16]
  • 60,005,231 people have received at least one dose and 31,285,186 people have received two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine.[17]
  • The states with the highest rate of cases per 100,000 people in the country this week are New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and South Carolina. New Jersey, which has 37 cases per 100,000 people in the state, is currently seeing an average of 3,322 new COVID-19 cases per day.[18]
  • December saw the highest number of COVID-19-related deaths in the United States, surpassing those in April. 57,638 people in America died, an average of 2,506 deaths per day compared to an average of 1,842 deaths per day in April at the beginning of the pandemic.[19]

Risk in population

COVID-19 deaths reported to National Center for Health Statistics as of March 3, 2021[20]

Age group Total number of deathsPercentage of reported deaths
0-248550.17%
25-4411,4572.32%
45-5422,9874.65%
55-6458,70811.88%
65-74107,21321.69%
75+293,01559.29%

Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19 by Demographic Characteristics as of March 3, 2021[21]

Population Total
Female45.39%
Male54.61%
White40.10%
Black13.30%
American Indian or Alaskan Native0.40%
Asian10.00%
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander0.20%
Hispanic34.00%
Other2.10%

Known cases in Connecticut (call 211 or text “CTCOVID” to 898211 for information)

  • As of March 7 2021 there were 287,396 confirmed and probable cases (+12,062 from February 22), 388 hospitalizations (-112 from February 22), and 7,725 deaths (+163 from February 22). 6,997,922 patients have been tested in the state with a 2.63% daily positivity rate.[22]
  • Confirmed and probable cumulative cases by county[23]
    • Fairfield County:  82,350 cases, 2,079 deaths
    • Hartford County: 71,388 cases, 2,304 deaths
    • Litchfield County: 11,399 cases, 281 deaths
    • Middlesex County: 10,67. cases, 344 deaths
    • New Haven County: 73,618 cases, 1,937 deaths
    • New London County: 19,568 cases, 416 deaths
    • Tolland County: 8,038 cases, 172 deaths 
    • Windham County: 9,370 cases, 182 deaths

Cumulative Cases and Deaths in CT with Percent Increase from Previous Reporting Period by County

CountyMar. 7Feb. 22Feb. 4Jan. 22Jan. 4Dec. 17
Fairfield Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
82,35 
(4.5)
2,079
(2.2)
78,803
(5.9)
2,034
(4.5)
74,404
(7.7)
1,947
(3.2)
69,065
(17.1)
1,886
(7.5)
58,959
(16.5)
1,755
(7.8)
50,614
(12.5)
1,628
(3.2)
Hartford Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
71, 388
(3.3)
2,304 
(2.0)
69,078 
(5.5)
2,258
(3.7)
65,496
(9.1)
2,178
(6.3)
60,027
(21.1)
2,048
(7.8)
49,560
(22.0)
1,900 
(9.6)
40,611
(17.7)
1,733 
(4.1)
Litchfield Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
11,399 
(4.4)
281 
(3.3)
10,917 
(6.4)
272 
(5.0)
10,256
(9.2)
259
(5.3)
9,391
(19.1)
246
(6.0)
7,885 
(22.0)
232
(13.2)
6,515 
(17.7)
205 
(12.6)
Middlesex Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
10,673 
(4.5)
344
(1.2)
10,212
(6.9)
340
(4.6)
9,549
(9.6)
325
(5.9)
8,712
(23.6)
307
(19.0)
7,047 
(31.3)
258
(13.2)
5,367
(18.4)
228
(6.0)
New Haven Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
73,618
(5.4)
1,937
(1.7)
69,832
(6.6)
1,905
(4.7)
65,488
(9.0)
1,820
(4.7)
60,085
(19.5)
1,738
(9.7)
50,290
(20.5)
1,584
(11.2)
41,723
(16.8)
1,425
(6.7)
New London Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
19,568
(4.1)
416 
(2.7)
18,791 
(6.8)
405 
(7.7)
17,587
(12.1)
376 
(9.6)
15,684
(35.0)
343
(29.9)
11,616
(29.9)
264
(25.1)
8,940
(21.9)
211
(11.6)
Tolland Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
8,038
(4.8)
172 
(6.8)
7,673 
(7.1)
161
(10.3)
7,163
(11.5)
146 
(15.9)
6,422
(22.9)
126
(11.5)
5,225 
(24.5)
113 
(13.0)
4,197 
(17.0)
100 
(16.3)
Windham Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
9,370 
(3.2)
182 
(2.2)
9,081
(6.0)
178
(14.8)
8,571
(12.2)
155
(29.2)
7,642
(34.6)
120
(39.5)
5,676
(36.7)
86
(68.6)
4,153 
(26.2)
51
(41.7)

Connecticut Cumulative Statistics by Month for Age and Race/Ethnicity

COVID Cases (Deaths) by AgeMar. 7Feb. 21Feb. 4Jan. 22
0 – 9 cases (deaths)15,753 (1)14,905 (2)13,690 (2)12,049 (1)
10 – 19 cases (deaths)31,021 (4)29,269 (3)27,065 (3)24,331 (1)
20 – 29 cases (deaths)49,232 (9)46,977 (9)44,256 (7)40,725 (6)
30 – 39 cases (deaths)44,111 (38)42,253 (36)39,838 (33)36,634 (32)
40 – 49 cases (deaths)40,260 (118)38,496 (111)36,326 (103)33,398 (95)
50 – 59 cases (deaths)44,272 (391)42,505 (373)40,147 (349)36,783 (323)
60 – 69 cases (deaths)30,470 (974)29,318 (947)27,714 (903)25,529 (858)
70 – 79 cases (deaths)16,314 (1,723)15,902 (1,691)15,120 (1,612)14,022 (1,523)
80+ cases (deaths)15,811 (4,467)15,593 (4,390)15,145 (4,202)14,293 (3,980)
COVID Cases (Deaths) by Race/Ethnicity
Hispanic cases (deaths)41,738 (785)40,391 (757)38,252 (711)36,003 (664)
American Indian or Alaskan Native cases (deaths)394 (3)388 (3)382 (3)353 (3)
Asian or Pacific Islander cases (deaths)3,043 (83)2,835 (82)2,632 (81)2,408 (78)
Black cases (deaths)19,778 (912)18,884 (897)17,851 (872)16,504 (851)
Multiracial cases (deaths) 17,927 (357)16,392 (320)14,349 (263)12,035 (188)
Other cases (deaths)15, 376 (39)14,750 (38)13,630 (34)12,046 (32)
White cases (deaths) 86,205 (5,420)80,842 (5,342)75,634 (5,135)69,352 (4,894)
Unknown cases (deaths)102,935 (126)100,852 (123)96,642 (115)89,114 (109)
  • As of March 8, 2021 the Yale New Haven Health System has 163 hospitalized patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis, down from 210 last week. For context, at the height of the April peak in cases 750 patients were hospitalized.
  • Yale New Haven Health Hospital currently has 106 patients, Greenwich Hospital currently has 13 patients, Westerly Hospital has 1, Bridgeport Hospital has 36, and Lawrence and Memorial Hospital has 7.  

Connecticut developments

  • Governor Ned Lamont announced the easing of some COVID-19 restrictions beginning March 19. Capacity limits on certain businesses such as restaurants, gyms, and offices will be lifted and indoor and outdoor gathering sizes have been increased. However, the mask mandate and 11 pm curfew for restaurants and entertainment venues will still remain in place. Bars that only serve beverages will continue to remain closed.[24]
  • In a major break from federal guidance, Governor Ned Lamont has announced that Connecticut will shift to an age-based COVID-19 vaccine rollout. Beginning March 1st, those aged 55-64 may sign up followed by those aged 45-54 on March 22, aged 35-44 on April 12th, and aged 16-34 on May 3rd. Previously, those with underlying medical conditions and essential workers would have been the next group to become eligible for vaccinations. However, school staff will still be given priority with special clinics for educational staff opening March 1st.[25]
  • Professor Gregg Gonsalves of the Yale School of Public Health has criticized Connecticut’s new vaccine strategy, as essential workers and those with comorbidities will no longer necessarily be next in line for vaccination. Professor Gonsalves recommends a strategy that balances age-based prioritization with strategies that will allow some of the state’s residents that are also vulnerable to COVID-19 to be vaccinated.[26]
  • Professor Nathan Grubaugh of the Yale School of Public Health has also criticized Connecticut’s reopening plan, specifically Governor Lamont’s plan to lift indoor capacity limits for most venues in the state. Professor Grubaugh has called the plan a “terrible idea” as the COVID-19 B.1.1.7 variant is accounting for more new coronavirus cases throughout the state and country. The B.1.1.7 variant, first discovered in the United Kingdom, is more transmissible and could cause an increase in COVID-19 cases when paired with more lenient restrictions on gatherings.[27]
  • Connecticut has one of the highest rates of vaccination with 26% of residents age 15 and older have received one dose. In total, Connecticut has administered more than 1.1 million doses.[28]

Known cases in Rhode Island (call 401-222-8022 for information)

As of March 8, 2021[29]

  • 128,981 confirmed cumulative cases (+5,836 from 2/19/21; a 4.74% increase in the two-week period)
  • 3,128,043 total tests conducted (+274,259 from 2/19/21)
  • 232,379 people have received the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine (+93,706 from 2/19/21)
  • 91,387 people have received two doses of a COVID-19 vaccine (+30,611 from 2/19/21)
  • 133 patients currently hospitalized (-44 from 2/19/21)
  • 21 patients currently in ICU (-8 from 2/19/21)
  • 2,549 deaths in the state (+173 from 2/19/21)

Rhode Island developments

  • Rhode Island is among the top states with the highest rate of new COVID-19 cases. Currently the state has the third-highest rate, at 34 new cases per 100,000 people. Over the past two weeks, Rhode Island has seen an 8% increase in its number of new COVID-19 cases.[30]
  • CVS and Walgreens pharmacies in Rhode Island are taking part in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program which has allowed them to expand vaccinations to educators, school staff, and childcare workers.[31]

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