Case Surveillance Update | 2021.5.3

Summary

  • As of May 2, 147,047,012 people have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. Over 312 million doses of vaccines have been delivered to states, territories, and federal agencies that are charged with distribution.[1]
  • The number of new COVID-19 cases in the US have decreased 27% in the past two weeks. The weekly average of new cases per day (N=49,266) is the lowest it has been since early October.[2]
  • New coronavirus cases in Connecticut have declined in the past two weeks. The state is currently seeing an average of 638 new cases per day, compared to 1,068 cases per day two weeks ago.[3] Connecticut, along with New York and New Jersey, will be relaxing nearly all COVID-related restrictions on May 19.[4][5]
  • The number of daily COVID-19 cases have also declined in Rhode Island, with an average of 266 new cases per day this week, compared to 436 cases per day two weeks ago.[6]

International case numbers

  • 152,966,008 COVID-19 diagnosed cases worldwide; 3,204,395 deaths; 89,711,382 recovered.[7] More than 1.16 billion doses of vaccines have been administered in 174 countries.[8]
  • The United States continues to have the highest number of reported COVID-19 cases at 32,442,361. India has the second highest number of reported cases with 19,925,604, Brazil third with 14,754,910 cases, and France fourth with 5,713,393 cases.[9]
  • India is facing a severe oxygen shortage amid a widespread COVID-19 outbreak, complicating medical treatment for those with severe coronavirus cases. The dramatic increase in case numbers appears to be driven by the B.1.17 COVID-19 variant as well as a new variant, B.1.617. On Saturday, India reported nearly 3,700 deaths and just under 400,000 new coronavirus cases.[10]
  • Russia may be under-reporting the toll that COVID-19 has had in the country. Though Russia’s official death toll due to coronavirus is just over 102,000, reported deaths from all causes in 2020 are 28% higher than normal– meaning that COVID-19 may have actually caused excess deaths closer to 362,000 in Russia. For comparison, the US saw a 17% rise in deaths above normal in 2020, meaning the excess death toll attributable to COVID-19 is estimated to be about 385,000 people; the US has officially reported about 316,000 excess deaths due to the coronavirus.[11]
  • Vaccination with the AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson one-shot vaccines have been paused in many countries as both appear to be linked to a rare but severe blood clotting issue. The two vaccines were created in a similar way, and both appear to trigger an antibody response that causes white blood cells to clot.[12] Of the roughly 7 million people in the US who have received a Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine, only 6 people– all white women between the ages of 18 and 48– developed the severe blood clot disorder.[13]
  • Multiple variants of the COVID-19 virus have been discovered throughout the world. While research is ongoing, it appears that variants generally may spread between people more easily but are not necessarily more deadly on a per incident basis. Research so far suggests that COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized for use in the United States are effective against the variants.[14]

Distribution of new coronavirus cases and deaths worldwide each week (from The World Health Organization COVID-19 Weekly Situation Update, as of 4/25/2021).[15]

US National case numbers

  • 32,442,361 cases of coronavirus confirmed by lab tests, 577,046 deaths, and 436,289,138 total tests conducted.[16]
  • 147,047,012 people have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 104,774,652 people are fully vaccinated.[17]
  • This week, the states with the highest rate of cases per 100,000 people are Michigan, Colorado, Minnesota, Delaware, and Pennsylvania. Michigan, which has 41 cases per 100,000 people in the state, is currently seeing an average of 4,054 new COVID-19 cases per day.[18]
  • Experts believe that reaching herd immunity against COVID-19 may be an illusory goal in the US. Based on slowing rates of vaccination and highly-contagious coronavirus variants, public health officials now believe that COVID-19 will likely persist in the country and continue to cause hospitalizations and deaths for many years to come, but at lower rates.[19]

Risk in population

COVID-19 deaths reported to National Center for Health Statistics as of April 28, 2021[20]

Age group Total number of deathsPercentage of reported deaths
0-241,0420.19%
25-4413,4652.42%
45-5427,1444.87%
55-6468,76912.34%
65-74123,30922.12%
75+323,75758.07%

Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19 by Demographic Characteristics as of April 28, 2021[21]

Population Total
Female45.14%
Male54.86%
White39.60%
Black13.20%
American Indian or Alaskan Native0.40%
Asian10.10%
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander0.20%
Hispanic34.50%
Other2.00%

Known cases in Connecticut (call 211 or text “CTCOVID” to 898211 for information)

  • As of April 29, 2021 there were 339,233 confirmed and probable cases (+10,171 from April 16; a 3.09% increase), 383 hospitalizations (-103 from April 16), and 8,097 deaths (+102 from April 16). 8,658,768 patients have been tested in the state with a 2.02% daily positivity rate.[22]
  • Confirmed and probable cumulative cases by county[23]
    • Fairfield County: 98,131 cases, 2,165 deaths
    • Hartford County: 81,660 cases, 2,394 deaths
    • Litchfield County: 14,323 cases, 293 deaths
    • Middlesex County: 12,547 cases, 362 deaths
    • New Haven County: 89,526 cases, 2,069 deaths
    • New London County: 21,907 cases, 441 deaths
    • Tolland County: 9,350 cases, 182 deaths 
    • Windham County: 10,622 cases, 191 deaths

Cumulative Cases and Deaths in CT with Percent Increase from Previous Reporting Period by County

CountyApr. 30 Apr. 19Mar. 18Mar. 7Feb. 22Feb. 4Jan. 22
Fairfield
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
98,131
(2.9)
2,165
(1.1)
95,372
(11.9)
2,142
(2.1)
85,225
(3.5)
2,097
(0.9)
82,35 
(4.5)
2,079
(2.2)
78,803
(5.9)
2,034
(4.5)
74,404
(7.7)
1,947
(3.2)
69,065
(17.1)
1,886
(7.5)
Hartford
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
81,660
(2.6)
2,394
(1.1)
79,391
(8.6)
2,368
(1.5)
73,092
(2.4)
2,333
(1.3)
71, 388
(3.3)
2,304 
(2.0)
69,078 
(5.5)
2,258
(3.7)
65,496
(9.1)
2,178
(6.3)
60,027
(21.1)
2,048
(7.8)
Litchfield
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
14,323
(3.3)
293
(1.2)
13,859
(16.1)
289
(1.8)
11,942 
(4.8)
284 
(1.1)
11,399 
(4.4)
281 
(3.3)
10,917 
(6.4)
272 
(5.0)
10,256
(9.2)
259
(5.3)
9,391
(19.1)
246
(6.0)
Middlesex
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
12,547
(2.7)
362
(1.4)
12,213
(10.4)
357
(2.3)
11,056
(3.6)
349
(1.5)
10,673 
(4.5)
344
(1.2)
10,212
(6.9)
340
(4.6)
9,549
(9.6)
325
(5.9)
8,712
(23.6)
307
(19.0)
New Haven
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
89,526
(3.8)
2,069
(1.8)
86,260
(12.8)
2,032
(2.6)
76,466
(3.9)
1,980 
(2.2)
73,618
(5.4)
1,937
(1.7)
69,832
(6.6)
1,905
(4.7)
65,488
(9.0)
1,820
(4.7)
60,085
(19.5)
1,738
(9.7)
New London
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
21,907
(2.2)
441
(3.3)
21,432
(7.1)
427
(2.2)
20,012
(2.3)
418
(0.5)
19,568
(4.1)
416 
(2.7)
18,791 
(6.8)
405 
(7.7)
17,587
(12.1)
376 
(9.6)
15,684
(35.0)
343
(29.9)
Tolland
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
9,350
(2.8)
182
(1.7)
9,092
(9.9)
179
(0.6)
8,276 
(3.0)
178 
(3.5)
8,038
(4.8)
172 
(6.8)
7,673 
(7.1)
161
(10.3)
7,163
(11.5)
146 
(15.9)
6,422
(22.9)
126
(11.5)
Windham
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
10,622
(2.8)
191
(1.1)
10,337
(7.9)
189
(2.7)
9,579 
(2.2)
184
(1.1)
9,370 
(3.2)
182 
(2.2)
9,081
(6.0)
178
(14.8)
8,571
(12.2)
155
(29.2)
7,642
(34.6)
120
(39.5)

Connecticut Cumulative Statistics by Month for Age and Race/Ethnicity

COVID Cases (Deaths) by Age[24]Apr. 30Apr. 19Mar. 18Mar. 7Feb. 21Feb. 4
0 – 9 cases (deaths)20,271 (1)19,263 (1)16,529 (1)15,753 (1)14,905 (2)13,690 (2)
10 – 19 cases (deaths)39,778 (4)37,859 (4)32,508 (4)31,021 (4)29,269 (3)27,065 (3)
20 – 29 cases (deaths)59,211 (9)57,177 (8)50,980 (8)49,232 (8)46,977 (8)44,256 (7)
30 – 39 cases (deaths)52,588 (39)50,919 (39)45,586 (37)44,111 (38)42,253 (36)39,838 (33)
40 – 49 cases (deaths)47,464 (137)46,166 (132)41,558 (123)40,260 (118)38,496 (111)36,326 (103)
50 – 59 cases (deaths)51,075 (432)49,941 (415)45,578 (401)44,272 (391)42,505 (373)40,147 (349)
60 – 69 cases (deaths)33,942 (1,056)33,382 (1,038)31,261 (1,002)30,470 (974)29,318 (947)27,714 (903)
70 – 79 cases (deaths)17,412 (1,8313)17,185 (1,791)16,550 (1,749)16,314 (1,723)15,902 (1,691)15,120 (1,612)
80+ cases (deaths)16,411 (4,606)16,300 (4,567)15,940 (4,504)15,811 (4,467)15,593 (4,390)15,145 (4,202)
COVID Cases (Deaths) by Race/Ethnicity[25]
Hispanic cases (deaths)48,284  (842)46,604 (824)42, 743 (803)41,738 (785)40,391 (757)38,252 (711)
American Indian or Alaskan Native cases (deaths)409 (3)408 (3)400(3)394 (3)388 (3)382 (3)
Asian or Pacific Islander cases (deaths)3,904 (90)3,714 (88)3,187 (86)3,043 (83)2,835 (82)2,632 (81)
Black cases (deaths)23,629 (948)22,628 (936)20,297 (926)19,778 (912)18,884 (897)17,851 (872)
Multiracial cases (deaths) 23,268 (406)22,232 (396)19,098 (370)17,927 (357)16,392 (320)14,349 (263)
Other cases (deaths)18,171 (44)17,642 (44)16,006 (42)15, 376 (39)14,750 (38)13,630 (34)
White cases (deaths) 104,626 (5,630)101,029 (5,576)89,427 (5,472)86,205 (5,420)80,842 (5,342)75,634 (5,135)
Unknown cases (deaths)116,942 (134)114,805 (128)105,533 (130)102,935 (126)100,852 (123)96,642 (115)
  • As of April 26, 2021 the Yale New Haven Health System has 202 hospitalized patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis, up from 184 patients during the week of April 11. For context, at the height of last year’s April peak in cases 750 patients were hospitalized. 
  • Yale New Haven Hospital currently has 102 patients, 29 of whom are in the ICU and 19 of whom are on ventilators. Greenwich Hospital currently has 20 patients, Westerly Hospital has 4, Bridgeport Hospital has 58, and Lawrence and Memorial Hospital has 17.  

Connecticut developments

  • All people who live, work, or go to school in Connecticut age 16 and over can now sign up to schedule a COVID vaccine. Currently, 55.6% of all people across the state have received at least one dose and 40.0% are fully vaccinated.[26]
  • All COVID-related outdoor restrictions have been lifted in Connecticut, with many other business restrictions set to end on May 19. Private businesses, however, can still establish their own regulations to limit the spread of COVID, such as requiring patrons to wear face masks even when outdoors.[27]
  • Connecticut recorded its lowest COVID-19 positivity rate on Thursday, April 29 in months. The rate of 1.34% positive coronavirus tests is the lowest since early October.[28]

Known cases in Rhode Island (call 401-222-8022 for information)

As of April 30, 2021[29]

  • 148,186 confirmed cumulative cases (+4,037 from 4/16/21; an 2.80% increase)
  • 4,019,021 total tests conducted (+212,059 from 4,16/21)
  • 552,552 people have received the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine (+80,528 from 4/16/21)
  • 395,231 people are fully vaccinated (+67,487 from 4/16/21)
  • 143 patients currently hospitalized (+10 from 4/16/21)
  • 30 patients currently in ICU (+2 from 4/16/21)
  • 2,671 deaths in the state (+24 from 4/16/21)

Rhode Island developments

  • All Rhode Island residents age 16 and older are now eligible to sign up for a COVID-19 vaccine.[30] Currently, 58.6% of all eligible residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine and 41.2% are fully vaccinated.[31]
  • Rhode Island will lift many of its COVID-related restrictions in May. On May 7, all people will not have to wear a mask outdoors unless they are within 3 feet of someone else. By May 28, the state plans to lift indoor capacity restrictions, though people will still have to remain 3 feet away from others and wear face masks indoors.[32]
  • The Rhode Island Health Department estimates that 40% of all new COVID-19 cases in the state are now caused by more contagious coronavirus variants. At least 23 cases of the B.1.1.7 COVID-19 variant have been confirmed in the state so far.[33]

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