Case Surveillance Update | 2020.10.12

Trends in short

  • The number of new COVID-19 cases in Connecticut has risen in the last two weeks, reaching a positivity rate of 1.4%. Governor Lamond is issuing an executive order giving mayors the power to determine if they need to roll back to Phase 2 even as Connecticut moved into Phase 3 on October 8th.[1] This week the state is seeing an average of 249 new cases per day, compared to 151 new cases per day two weeks ago.[2]
  • New cases are also rising in Rhode Island, which is seeing an average of 174 new cases per day this week compared to 115 per day two weeks ago.[3]
  • In the past 14 days, the rate of new cases in the United States has increased by 15%. However, the daily average of deaths due to COVID-19 continues to decline and is down 5% over the past 14 days.[4]

International case numbers

  • 37,694,366 COVID-19 cases worldwide; 1,078,874 deaths; 26,130,898 recovered.[5]
  • The United States has the highest number of COVID-19 cases at 7,796,625 cases. India has the second highest number of cases with 7,120,538 cases, Brazil third with 5,094,979, and Russia fourth with 1,305,093.[6] The number of cases in India have increased dramatically since July and the country is expected to surpass the US in total cases within the next few weeks. 

Distribution of new coronavirus cases and deaths worldwide each week (from The World Health Organization COVID-19 Situation Update, as of 10/12/2020).[7]

US National case numbers

  • 7,796,625 cases of coronavirus confirmed by lab tests, 215,028 deaths, and 3,075,077 recovered cases. 115,424,481 total tests have been conducted.[8]
  • The highest-risk states in the country are currently North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Wisconsin, and Utah. In the past two weeks, new COVID-19 cases have increased by 125% in Montana.[9]

Risk in population

COVID-19 deaths reported to National Center for Health Statistics as of October 7, 2020[10]
Age group Total number of deathsPercentage of reported deaths
0-244410.22%
25-445,5802.81%
45-5410,6275.35%
55-6425,42112.79%
65-7442,95021.60%
75+113,79057.24%
Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19 by Demographic Characteristics as of October 7, 2020[11]
Population Total
Female45.94%
Male54.06%
White40.10%
Black15.30%
American Indian or Alaskan Native0.30%
Asian9.90%
Hispanic32.40%
Other2.00%

Known cases in Connecticut (call 211 or text “CTCOVID” to 898211 for information)

  • As of October 8, 2020 there are 60,038 confirmed and probable cases (+290 from October 7), 134 hospitalizations (+6 from October 7), and 4,530 deaths. 1,794,099 patients have been tested in the state.[12]
  • There has been an increase in cases in Connecticut due to an outbreak in Danbury. Danbury’s mayor has attributed the increase in cases to travel, youth sports, and large worship services. Danbury schools have shifted to virtual learning for the school year as a result.[13]
  • Confirmed and probable cases:
    • Fairfield County: 20,752 cases, 1,426 deaths
    • Hartford County: 15,520 cases, 1,442 deaths
    • Litchfield County: 1,919 cases, 141 deaths
    • Middlesex County: 1,667 cases, 193 deaths
    • New Haven County: 14,877 cases, 1,118 deaths
    • New London County: 2,570 cases, 126 deaths
    • Tolland County: 1,502 cases, 67 deaths
    • Windham County: 1,108 cases, 17 deaths
    • Pending address validation: 118 cases, 5 deaths

Cumulative Cases and Deaths in CT with Percent Increase from Previous Reporting Period

CountyOct 12Sept 27Sept 13August 31August 18
Fairfield
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)

20,752 (3.0)
1,426 (0.2)

20,141 (3.2)
1,422 (0.2)

19,518 (3.1)
1,419 (0.3)

18,939 (1.0)
1,415 (0.4)

18,347 (1.7)
1,410 (0.1)
Hartford
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)

15,520 (5.8)
1,442 (1.0)

14,670 (4.3)
1,434 (0.2)

14,060 (3.9)
1,431 (0.4)

13,529 (4.4)
1,425 (0.4)

12,956 (1.2)
1,419 (0.3)
Litchfield
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)

1,919 (2.5)
141
(0.0)

1,872 (4.4)
141
(0.7)

1,793 (4.7)
140
(1.4)

1,713 (4.6)
138
(0.0)

1,638 (1.4)
139
(1.0)
Middlesex
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)

1,667 (5.3)
193
(0.0)

1,583 (3.9)
193
(0.0)

1,524 (4.0)
193
(0.5)

1,466 (2.9)
192
(0.0)

1,425 (1.4)
192
(0.0)
New Haven
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)

14,877 (3.1)
1,118 (0.3)

14,434 (2.7)
1,115 (0.3)

14,059 (2.5)
1,111 (0.1)

13,711 (2.4)
1,109 (0.0)

13,388 (1.2)
1,111 (0.5)
New London
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)

2,570 (31.1)
126
(9.6)

1,959 (17.0)
115
(3.6)

1,677 (5.7)
111
(5.0)

1,587 (5.8)
106
(0.0)

1,499 (2.9)
106
(3.0)
Tolland
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)

1,502 (10.8)
67
(0.0)

1,356 (6.8)
67
(3.1)

1,270 (10.7)
65
(0.0)

1,147 (6.1)
65
(0.0)

1,081 (2.3)
65
(0.0)
Windham
Cases
(% increase)
Deaths
(% increase)
1,108 (12.5)
17 (6.3)
985 (13.5)
16
(6.7)
868
(7.6)
15
(0.0)
807
(5.2)
15
(0.0)
767
(3.1)
15
(0.0)

Connecticut Cumulative Statistics by Month for Age and Race/Ethnicity per 100,000 

Age, total (deaths)Race/ethnicity rate per 100,000 population (deaths)
(end of month) Cases, (Deaths)<2020-4950-69>70WhiteBlackHispanic Other
Mar.3,128 (69)94 (0)1,419 (3)1,150 (25)461 (60)NANANANA
Apr.27,700 (2,257)775 (2)10,820 (52)9,299 (391)6,572 (1,808)365 (67)829 (89)723 (34)211 (11)
May42,743 (3,970)1,617 (2)16,792 (75)13,547 (655)10,660 (3,237)584 (116)1,365 (146)1,248 (56)755 (42)
June46,572 (4,324)2,024 (2)18,805 (81) 14,380 (708)11,304 (3,533)677 (132)1,577 (166)1,493 (63)860 (47)
July49,810 (4,432)2,572 (2)20,518 (82)15,104 (725)11,561 (3,623)728 (135)1,681 (169)1,601 (65)888 (47)
Aug.53,006 (4,466)3,236 (2)22,284 (82)15,731 (730)11,728 (3,652)773 (136)1,814 (170)1,738 (67)977 (48)
Sept.60,038 (4,530)4,755 (2)25,983 (85)17,089 (747)12,184 (3,696)832 (137)1,918 (172)1,921 (68)1,081 (49)
  • The Yale New Haven Health System currently has 72 hospitalized patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis. The number of hospitalized patients in the system has doubled over the past ten days. YYNH currently has 31 patients, 6 of whom are in the ICU and 4 of whom are on ventilators. GH currently has 10 patients, BH has 18, and L and M have 13. 
  • There has been a COVID-19 outbreak among the Yale men’s hockey team which is now considered a super-spreader event. 18 of the 23 men on the team have contracted the virus, causing the University to move from “green” status to “yellow” status due to the outbreak. 

Connecticut developments

  • Phase 3 reopening of Connecticut began on October 8. This phase of the reopening will allow for 75% capacity indoors at businesses such as restaurants, salons, and libraries as long as COVID-19 safety precautions are observed. Outdoor venues and indoor performing arts venues will be allowed to increase to 50% capacity with social distancing and mandatory mask requirements. Bars and nightclubs will continue to remain closed.[14]
  • The number of COVID-19 hospitalizations is the highest it’s been in months with 155 patients. These hospitalizations are not localized but spread across many counties with Fairfield County at the highest at 42 hospitalized patients.[15]

Known cases in Rhode Island (call 401-222-8022 for information)

  • As of October 11, 2020[16]
    • 26,294 confirmed cumulative cases (+1,870 from 9/28/20)
    • 864,638 total tests conducted (+111,482 from 9/28/20)
    • 112 patients currently hospitalized (+18 from 9/28/20)
    • 10 patients currently in ICU (+2 from 9/28/20)
    • 1,130 deaths in the state (+20 from 9/28/20)

Rhode Island developments

  • Governor Raimondo announced in an interview that the state is unlikely to see any more changes to its COVID-19 restrictions until there is a vaccine. She reinforced this view by noting the recent increase in coronavirus cases in Rhode Island.[17]
  • Rhode Island is forming a special panel to create a plan to distribute a COVID-19 vaccine when there is one available. The state already has a Vaccine Advisory Committee and has successfully implemented flu and childhood vaccine distribution plans. Governor Raimondo said a COVID-19 vaccine will not be distributed until it is safe to do so.[18]
  • Colleges and universities in Rhode Island that have taken a more aggressive approach to COVID-19 testing appear to be seeing positive results compared to those that took a more relaxed approach. Colleges and universities in the state that have not been conducting regular tests of all students have seen an uptick in coronavirus outbreaks while those that test all students regularly (up to twice per week) have been able to stem outbreaks quickly and so have avoided becoming hotspots.[19]

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